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    PSY 133  Introduction to Psychology (Fall, TTh 9:30-10:50)

    This course is a survey of the study of the mind and human behavior and is designed to foster understanding of psychology as a scientific, research based endeavor.  This survey will acquaint you with the major concepts and terminology of the discipline and give you a better understanding of self and others as you learn about psychology from several different perspectives:  psychology as an academic science, psychology in your own life, and psychology in the broader world.  Prerequisite/Co-requisite:  ENG 100 or above.  3 cr. 3 Lec.

    SOC 144  Introduction to Sociology (Spring, TTh 9:30-10:50)

    This course involves an introduction to the scientific study of human society and social behavior.  Emphasis is on the topics of:  the sociological perspective, including the social construction of reality; culture and society; socialization; group interaction; deviance; social stratification; basic social institutions and social change.  Prerequisite: None. 3 cr.  Lec.

    ECO 101  Macroeconomics (Spring, MWF 10:10-11:05) 

    Macroeconomics is a study of economic analysis as applied to problems of economic growth, business fluctuations, unemployment and inflation.  Monetary and fiscal policies are evaluated as techniques used to achieve the economic goals of society.  Prerequisite:  Equivalent of MTH 125, MTH 155, or higher. 3 cr. 3 Lec.

    MTH 185  Precalculus (Fall, MTWTh 8:00-8:55)

    This course provides sufficient mathematical background for Calculus.  Topics covered include properties and graphs of functions, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, equations and inequalities, and analytic geometry.  Students will be expected to demonstrate competence in the use of current technology as it applies to Precalculus topics.  Prerequisite:  Three years of high school mathematics, or MTH 155 (College Algebra), or permission of instructor.  4 cr. 4 Lec.

    MTH 221  Calculus 1 (Spring, MTWTh 8:00-8:55)

    This course is an introduction to Calculus with emphasis on the concepts of limit, continuity, the derivative, and an introduction to integration. MTH 221 includes the following applications of the derivative: the derivative as a rate of change, optimization, and the application of the derivative to the solution of word problems. Students are required to develop and demonstrate literacy with current technology as it applies to the study of Calculus 1.  Prerequisite: 4 years of high school mathematics including Precalculus or MTH 185 (Precalculus). 4 cr. 4 Lec.
     
     
    CIS 110 - Introduction to Computing with Microcomputers (Fall)
    This is a non-programming course designed to familiarize the student with the use of modern microcomputers as tools for problem solving. Students will complete projects using application software for word processing, spreadsheets, graphics, telecommunications/Internet, and presentation software. Basic computer experience is required (i.e. operating system usage, fundamental word processor usage, etc.) Not recommended for students who test below MTH 125 or MTH 133, or test below CLS 101. 3 cr. 3 Lec. 1 Lab.
     
    BUS 104 - Personal Finance (Spring)
    This course provides an overview of personal finance as it relates to personal financial planning and budgeting, credit control, expense control, mortgage and consumer financing, tax planning and investments. It also covers the economic aspects of financial planning as it relates to household and business financial management. 3 cr. 3 Lec. 
     
     
    ENG 101 - Research and Composition (Fall)
    English 101 students will employ strategies and techniques for successful academic essay and research writing. The course is designed for students who demonstrate skill in the process of developing essays. Students will use a variety of methods and sources documented in MLA style. Students complete diverse, predominantly non-fiction reading and writing assignments designed to enhance their ability to write 4-5 complex essays for varied purposes, directed to academic audiences. At least one research essay that defends an arguable assertion is required for students to complete the course. Prerequisite: Placed into ENG 101 by CPT or by Department Chair or passed English 100. 3 cr. 3 Lec.
     
    ENG 102 - Literature and Composition (Spring)
    English 102 students will employ strategies and techniques for reading, analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating fiction, poetry, and drama. Readings will include literature of merit by male and female authors from diverse time periods, thematic areas, and cultural perspectives. Students will complete a variety of writing assignments designed to develop skills in literary analysis and will write formal, literature-based essays on the three genres. This course is designed for students who have already demonstrated college-level skills in essay writing and provides a foundation for upper-level literature courses. Prerequisite: ENG 101. 3 cr. 3 Lec.
     
     
    This humanities course is the first half of a 2-semester sequence that continues the development from FRE 122 of the four basic skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing with an emphasis on communication in French. Student participation in this course will be entirely in French. A study of French cultures and customs continues to be developed in this course. New students should have completed at least four years of high school French. This course is open to native speakers. Prerequisite: FRE 122, or permission of the instructor. At the discretion of the instructor, a placement test may be administered to assess the student's level of proficiency. 3 cr. 3 Lec.
     
    This Humanities course is the second half of a 2-semester sequence that continues the development of the four basic language skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing with an emphasis on communication. Student participation in this course will be entirely in French. The course also introduces literary analysis of French literature. New students should have completed at least four years of high school French. This course is open to native speakers. Prerequisite: FRE 221, or its equivalent, or permission of the instructor. At the discretion of the instructor, a placement test may be administered to assess the student¿s level of proficiency. 3 cr. 3 Lec.